Sunday, December 27, 2009

DENMARK GREEN CARD SCHEME,DENMARK IMMIGRATION,GREEN CARD,DENMARK GREEN CARD

DENMARK GREEN CARD SCHEME
 
It is possible to be granted a three-year residence permit for the purpose of seeking work, and subsequently working, in Denmark. A residence and work permit under the Green card scheme is issued on the basis of an individual evaluation using a point system designed to assess the likelihood that the applicant will be able to find qualified work in Denmark.


If you are a Nordic Citizen, you are free to reside, study and work in Denmark. If you are an EU/EEA Citizen or Swiss citizen seeking residence in Denmark based on the EU rules on freedom of movement, you may be subject to special regulations. More information about EU/EEA and Nordic citizens.

If you already hold a Danish residence permit based on family reunification or asylum, or hold a residence permit on humanitarian grounds, you do not need a work permit in order to work in Denmark.

It is your own responsibility to obtain a residence permit if you are required to. If you work illegally in Denmark, you risk deportation, and you and your employer risk fine or imprisonment.



Conditions For Green Card Scheme

In order to be granted a residence permit under the Green card scheme, you must attain at least 100 points. Points are given for: educational level, language skills, work experience, adaptability, and age.

You must have full health insurance covering you and any accompanying family members until you are covered by the Danish national health insurance.

You must be able to support yourself during your first year in Denmark.  Read more about financial requirements.

Educational level Requirement

Your educational level will be assessed after it has been converted to its Danish equivalent for comparison. This is done as academic degrees vary from country to country, even if they are called by the same name.

The Immigration Service will ask CIRIUS, a body under the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, to assess your educational level. To enable CIRIUS to do this, you must include diplomas as well as transcripts in your application.

Please note:
CIRIUS will only assess your educational level if asked to by the Immigration Service in connection with a specific application. Thus, CIRIUS will not assess your level prior to an application for a residence permit under the Greencard scheme.

In order to receive points for educational level, you must, as a minimum, have the equivalent of a Danish Bachelor’s degree. You will only be given points for one educational level. Points are given as follows:
  • Bachelor’s degree/Graduated from medium-length education: 30 points.
  • Bachelor's degree followed by one-year Master's degree: 50 points.
  • Master’s degree: 60 points.
  • PhD: 80 points.
You will be given bonus points if you graduated from a university which is internationally recognised for its high academic level according to the latest THES-QS World Ranking. Points are given as follows:
  • Top 400: 5 points.
  • Top 200: 10 points.
  • Top 100: 15 points.
See the top 400 list.

You will be given 10 bonus points if your education qualifies you to work in a field where Denmark is currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals. You can find these fields on the Positive List.

You can be given a maximum of 105 points for your educational level.


Language skills Requirement

Your language skills will be given points based on a four-level system modelled after the official Danish language proficiency tests for foreigners (the Danish Language Test, Levels 1, 2 and 3 and the Study Test in Danish as a Second Language).

In order to be given points for language skills, you must document that you have passed an exam in either Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German at a level corresponding to at least Danish Language Test, Level 1 (Prøve i Dansk 1). You can only receive points for one Scandinavian language and for either English or German. As such, you can receive points for both Swedish and English, or both Danish and German, but not for both Danish and Norwegian, or for both English and German.

Here is a list of foreign language exams with their corresponding Danish level. Only approved exams qualify for points. Other exams do not qualify for points.

As an alternative to a language exam, you can document your language skills with a statement from a previous employer attesting that you have used Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German on the job for at least one year, or by presenting documentation that you have completed at least one year of studies at a higher educational Programme which was taught in one of these languages. This will be accepted as a level corresponding to that of Study Test in Danish as a Second Language (Studieprøven). Points are given as follows:
  • Level corresponding to Danish Language Test, Level 1 (Prøve i Dansk 1): 5 points.
  • Level corresponding to Danish Language Test, Level 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2): 10 points.
  • Level corresponding to Danish Language Test, Level 3 (Prøve i Dansk 3): 15 points.
  • Level corresponding to Study Test in Danish as a Second Language (Studieprøven) or higher/one year's study or work: 20 points
You can be given a maximum of 30 points for your language skills.

Please note: Good Danish skills are often essential to engage effectively in the Danish labor market.

Work experience Requirement

Your work experience can be given points according to how many years, within the last five years, you have worked as a researcher or in a field where Denmark is currently experiencing a shortage of qualified professionals. You can see these fields and specific job titles on the Positive List. You can also be given points for other work experience. Points are given as follows:
  • 1-2 years within the past five years as a researcher/in field listed on the Positive List: 10 points.
  • 3-5 years within the past five years  as a researcher/in field listed on the Positive List: 15 points.
  • 3-5 years within the past five years, other work: 5 points.
You can be given a maximum of 15 points for your work experience.

Adaptability Requirement


You can be given points for your educational or work related attachment to the EU/EEA (including Denmark) or Switzerland, as this is seen to increase your ability to quickly adapt to the Danish labour market. Points are given for either education or work. Points are given as follows:
  • Completion of at least one year's study at a higher educational programme in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 5 points.
  • Completion of at least three years' study at a higher educational programme in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 10 points.
Or
  • At least one full year's (12 consecutive months') legal residence and work in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 5 points.
  • At least two consecutive year's legal residence and work in an EU/EEA country or Switzerland: 10 points.
You will be given 5 bonus points for Danish language skills (passed exam in Danish Language Test, Level 2 (Prøve i Dansk 2) or higher).

You can be given a maximum of 15 points for your adaptability.

Age Requirement

You can be given points based on your age. Points are given as follows:
  • 35-40 years: 10 points.
  • 34 years or younger: 15 points.
You can be given a maximum of 15 points for your age.

Foreign documents

Only color copies of foreign educational documents (such as diplomas, transcripts and other statements issued by educational institutions) are accepted.

The original documents must be presented when submitting your application at a Danish embassy, a police station in Denmark or at the Immigration Service, where an official will use them to certify that the copy is authentic.

When processing your application, we may request that you send us the original educational documents.

Please note that documents not written in Danish, English, German, Norwegian or Swedish must be submitted together with a certified translation in Danish or English.

Please also note that educational documents from Pakistan must be stamped by the Higher Education Commission.

Duration

A residence permit under the Green card scheme can be granted for up to three years with a possibility for extension of up to four years.

Your residence permit can only be granted or extended up to three months before your passport expires. This means that if your passport expires in 12 months, you can only be granted a permit for nine months, or your permit can only be extended by nine months.

Extension

Your residence permit can be extended by four years if you have worked for the past 12 months for a minimum of ten hours per week.

Your residence permit can be extended by one year if you have lost your job through no fault of your own (e.g. due to cutbacks) no more than three months before applying for an extension, and if prior to this, you worked for 12 months for a minimum of ten hours per week.

South Africa immigration,immigration to South Africa,South Africa immigration information,South Africa Visa Requirement

IMMIGRATION TO SOUTH AFRICA 
 
Every country has the sovereign right to decide who may or may not enter its territory. Possession of a visa does not guarantee automatic admission to the Republic. It only authorizes the holder to proceed to the Republic to report to an immigration officer at a port of entry for the purpose of being examined as to his/her ability or otherwise, to comply with the (entry) requirements of the Act.The purpose of a visa on the one hand is to ensure proper screening of applicants so that undesirable persons are not admitted to the Republic and on the other hand to facilitate the entry of approved applicants at South African ports of entry. Visas provide immigration officers with the necessary information to ensure that applicants are admitted for the correct purpose and period into the RSA.
Any queries relating to visas are handled by the South African missions or representative office in your country or the nearest one situated to you. Visas are considered by the South African missions abroad and must be affixed in the applicants' passports before departing to the RSA. Visas are not issued on arrival at South African ports of entry. Applicants arriving without visas will be refused entry into the RSA and placed on return flights in terms of legislation.


SOUTH AFRICA VISA REQUIREMENTS
  1. Passport valid for no less than 30 days after the expiry of the intended visit.
  2. Passports must contain at least 1 (one) unused page for entry/departure endorsements (sometimes referred to as visa page).
  3. Payment of the prescribed fee, if applicable (see Countries exempt from visa control).
  4. A vaccination certificate, if required by the Act.
  5. Statement and/or documentation confirming purpose and duration of visit.
  6. Two (2) identity photographs (see specifications below).
  7. Proof of financial means in the form of:
    • bank statements;
    • salary advices;
    • undertaking(s) by the host(s) in the Republic;
    • bursaries;
    • medical cover;
    • or cash available, including credit cards or travellers' cheques
    to cover the living expenses during the sojourn in the Republic.
  8. Applicants traveling by air must be in possession of:
    • a return or onward ticket; or
    • proof of sufficient funds; or
    • lodge a cash deposit of equivalent value to such a ticket.  
IMMIGRATION ON MEDICAL GROUNDS 
(Visit Visa For Medical Treatment Of Less Than Three [3] Months)
A person wishing to receive medical treatment in the RSA must first apply for a visitor's visa at the nearest South African Mission, if he or she is subject to South African visa control. Foreigners who are exempt from South African visa control may enter for the period for which they are exempt, provided that it does not exceed three months.

Foreigners who require medical treatment for a period exceeding three months must apply for a medical treatment permit.

Photographs

Photographs must comply to the following specifications:
  • Length - 45mm
  • Width - 35mm
  • The background of the photograph shall be plain and free of shadows and shall not have a white lining
  • Only the head and shoulders of the person concerned shall be included in the photograph and the head from the chin to the top of the hair shall not be smaller 22mm and not larger than 25mm
  • The person concerned shall be photographed without any head-gear or veil, and any other additions to the face which tend to alter the natural likeness shall be removed. (The Director-General may exempt any person or any category of persons from any of these requirements.)
  • Spectacles may be worn provided that the lenses do not make the eyes invisible. Spectacles with dark lenses may be worn if the eyes will appear distorted without them or if the person is blind
  • The full-face of the person concerned shall be photographed directly from the front, and the head may not be bent or tuned sideways
  • The face shall be a recognizable likeness of the person and the head, hair, eyebrows, eyes, nose and moustache or beard, if any, shall be sharply and clearly defined
  • Neither the photograph nor the copies thereof may be defaced by holes, pencil or ink marks or in any other manner
The Director-General may reject the copies of the photographs if they do not, in his or her judgment, comply with the requirements mentioned above, or if he or she deem them unsuitable in other respects, in which case the person concerned shall provide two new copies at his or her own cost.

Identity document and passport photographs could be taken at regional or district offices equipped for this service, at a cost of R13-00 for a frame of four black and white photographs .

Canada Sponsor Visa,Canada Sponsor,Sponsor Visa for Canada,How to Get Sponsor visa in Canada,Canada sponsorship

Canada Sponsor Visa


Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) knows it is important to help families who come from other countries to reunite in Canada. If you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada, you can sponsor your spouse, common-law partner, conjugal partner, dependent child (including adopted child) or other eligible relative (such as a parent or grandparent) to become a permanent resident.

CIC refers to the immigrants who are eligible to use this family sponsoring process as the Family Class.

If you become a permanent resident, you can live, study and work in Canada. For more information about being a permanent resident in Canada, see the Related Links section at the bottom of this page.

When you arrive in Canada as a permanent resident, you must make every reasonable effort to provide for your own essential needs and those of your family.

If you sponsor a relative to come to Canada as a permanent resident, you are responsible for supporting your relative financially when he or she arrives. As a sponsor, you must make sure your spouse or relative does not need to seek financial assistance from the government.

The process to sponsor your family begins when you, as a citizen or permanent resident in Canada, apply to be a sponsor.
There are two different processes for sponsoring your family. One process is used for sponsoring your spouse, conjugal or common-law partner and/or dependent children. Another process is used to sponsor other eligible relatives.
Who can apply

Your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children may be eligible to immigrate to Canada as permanent residents.
An application for Family Class sponsorship can be made if your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children live inside or outside Canada.
The first step is for you to apply as the sponsor. Both you, as the sponsor, and your relative must meet certain requirements.
Applicants for permanent residence must go through medical, criminal and background screening. Applicants with a criminal record may not be allowed to enter Canada. People who pose a risk to Canada’s security are also not allowed to enter Canada. Applicants may have to provide a certificate from police authorities in their home country.

Sponsoring a spouse, partner or dependent child

You can sponsor a spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children if you are a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada. To be a sponsor, you must be 18 years of age or older.
You can apply as a sponsor if your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or accompanying dependent children live with you in Canada, even if they do not have legal status in Canada. However, all the other requirements must be met.
You can also apply as a sponsor if your spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children live outside Canada, and if they meet all the requirements.
When you sponsor a spouse, common-law or conjugal partner, or dependent children to become permanent residents of Canada, you must promise to support them financially. Therefore, you have to meet certain income requirements. If you have previously sponsored relatives to come to Canada and they have later turned to the government for financial assistance, you may not be allowed to sponsor another person. Sponsorship is a big commitment, so you must take this obligation seriously.
To be a sponsor:
  • You and the sponsored relative must sign a sponsorship agreement that commits you to provide financial support for your relative, if necessary. This agreement also says the person becoming a permanent resident will make every effort to support her or himself.
  • You must provide financial support for a spouse, common-law or conjugal partner for three years from the date they become a permanent resident.
  • You must provide financial support for a dependent child for 10 years, or until the child turns 25, whichever comes first.


You may not be eligible to be a sponsor if you:
  • failed to provide financial support you agreed to when you signed a sponsorship agreement to sponsor another relative in the past
  • defaulted on a court-ordered support order, such as alimony or child support
  • received government financial assistance for reasons other than a disability
  • were convicted of a violent criminal offense, any offense against a relative or any sexual offense—depending on circumstances such as the nature of the offense, how long ago it occurred and whether a pardon was issued
  • defaulted on an immigration loan—late or missed payments
  • are in prison or
  • have declared bankruptcy and have not been released from it yet.
Other factors not included in this list might also make you ineligible to sponsor a relative.
If you live in Quebec, you must also meet Quebec’s immigration sponsorship requirements, after Citizenship and Immigration Canada approves you as a sponsor.


Spouse

You are a spouse if you are married to your sponsor and your marriage is legally valid.
If you were married in Canada:
  • You must have a marriage certificate issued by the province or territory where the marriage took place.
If you were married outside Canada:
  • The marriage must be valid under the law of the country where it took place and under Canadian law.
  • A marriage performed in an embassy or consulate must comply with the law of the country where it took place, not the country of nationality of the embassy or consulate.
Sponsoring your same-sex partner as a spouse

You can apply to sponsor your same-sex partner as a spouse if:
  • you are a Canadian citizen and permanent resident and
  • you were married in Canada and issued a marriage certificate by a Canadian province or territory on or after the following dates:
    • British Columbia (on or after July 8, 2003)
    • Manitoba (on or after September 16, 2004)
    • New Brunswick (on or after July 4, 2005)
    • Newfoundland and Labrador (on or after December 21, 2004)
    • Nova Scotia (on or after September 24, 2004)
    • Ontario (on or after June 10, 2003)
    • Quebec (on or after March 19, 2004)
    • Saskatchewan (on or after November 5, 2004)
    • Yukon (on or after July 14, 2004)
    • all other provinces or territories (on or after July 20, 2005).
If you were married outside Canada, you may apply to sponsor your same-sex partner as a spouse as long as the marriage is legally recognized according to both the law of the place where the marriage occurred and under Canadian law. This applies to same-sex marriages performed in the following jurisdictions:
  • Belgium
  • the Netherlands
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • the State of Massachusetts.


Common-law partner

You are a common-law partner—either of the opposite sex or same sex—if:
  • you have been living together in a conjugal relationship for at least one year in a continuous 12-month period that was not interrupted. (You are allowed short absences for business travel or family reasons, however.)
You will need proof that you and your common-law partner have combined your affairs and set up a household together. This can be in the form of:
  • joint bank accounts or credit cards
  • joint ownership of a home
  • joint residential leases
  • joint rental receipts
  • joint utilities (electricity, gas, telephone)
  • joint management of household expenses
  • proof of joint purchases, especially for household items or
  • mail addressed to either person or both people at the same address.

Conjugal partner

This category is for partners—either of the opposite sex or same sex—in exceptional circumstances beyond their control that prevent them from qualifying as common-law partners or spouses by living together.
A conjugal relationship is more than a physical relationship. It means you depend on each other, there is some permanence to the relationship and there is the same level of commitment as a marriage or a common-law relationship.
You may apply as a conjugal partner if:
  • you have maintained a conjugal relationship with your sponsor for at least one year and you have been prevented from living together or marrying because of:
    • an immigration barrier
    • your marital status (for example, you are married to someone else and living in a country where divorce is not possible) or
    • your sexual orientation (for example, you are in a same-sex relationship and same-sex marriage is not permitted where you live)
  • you can provide evidence there was a reason you could not live together (for example, you were refused long-term stays in each other’s country).
You should not apply as a conjugal partner if:
  • You could have lived together but chose not to. This shows that you did not have the level of commitment required for a conjugal relationship. (For example, one of you may not have wanted to give up a job or a course of study, or your relationship was not yet at the point where you were ready to live together.)
  • You cannot provide evidence there was a reason that kept you from living together.
  • You are engaged to be married. In this case, you should either apply as a spouse once the marriage has taken place or apply as a common-law partner if you have lived together continuously for at least 12 months.

Dependent children

A son or daughter is dependent when the child:
  • is under the age of 22 and does not have a spouse or common-law partner
  • is a full-time student and is substantially dependent on a parent for financial support since before the age of 22, or since becoming a spouse or common-law partner (if this happened before age 22) or
  • is financially dependent on a parent since before the age of 22 because of a disability.

Relationships that are not eligible

You cannot be sponsored as a spouse, a common-law partner or a conjugal partner if:
  • you are under 16 years of age
  • you (or your sponsor) were married to someone else at the time of your marriage
  • you have lived apart from your sponsor for at least one year and either you (or your sponsor) are the common-law or conjugal partner of another person
  • your sponsor immigrated to Canada and, at the time they applied for permanent residence, you were a family member who should have been examined to see if you met immigration requirements, but you were not examined
  • your sponsor previously sponsored another spouse, common-law partner or conjugal partner, and three years have not passed since that person became a permanent resident.